Planned Giving

Jewish National Fund's award-winning Planned Giving Department helps you meet your personal, financial and estate planning goals by making a lifetime or testamentary charitable gift. Learn what types of assets make the best gifts, and how to make a gift that provides tax benefits and even life income.

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Edmund Goulder

Edmund Goulder

When Edmund Goulder traveled to Israel 30 years ago with his brothers, he never anticipated that the experience would leave him with a renewed excitement for the future of the Jewish homeland. A WWII veteran who was forced to conceal his Jewish identity to ensure his survival as a prisoner of war, Goulder had come a long way for this journey.

In 1941 Goulder volunteered for military service in Cleveland, Ohio and became a pilot in the 384th bomb group, 547th bomb squadron of the 8th Air Force. Two years later, in 1943, Edmund was shot down during his 23rd mission in a B-17 over Belguim. After parachuting from his aircraft, he removed his dog tags, knowing that the word "Hebrew" would ensure he'd be caught by the Gestapo. Edmund hid in a farmhouse, then with a local family, and was eventually caught by the Gestapo and sent to a detention center in Lille for a long 23 days. In January of 1944 Goulder arrived at Stalag Luft 1, a prisoner of war camp, where he spent the next sixteen months biding his time playing sports and bridge with his fellow prisoners, and learning to adjust to the lack of food.

Years after he was freed, Goulder went to Israel with his brother; to this date, it is the only time he was visited the country. Upon arriving at the Western Wall, his prayer that he had scrawled on a piece of paper was only for his son to finally get a much-needed hair cut, but he found himself walking away with an increased sense of pride for Israel and the Jewish people. Edmund, now 92 years old, and his wife Joan have maintained a strong connection to Israel and Judaism by honoring the important values and traditions. Their involvement with Jewish National Fund seemed like an obvious way to connect with the Jewish homeland on a deep level.

"I became involved with JNF because of everything that the organization represents and does," says Goulder. "By contributing to JNF through a gift annuity, it is a win-win for everyone."

JNF's charitable gift annuities provide the annuitant with a generous income stream while simultaneously helping Israel achieve its financial goals. By establishing an annuity, Goulder received a charitable income tax deduction, the benefit of tax savings, and recognition in Israel. Nearly half of JNF's gift annuitants establish multiple gift annuities.

During his visit to Israel three decades ago, Goulder was inspired when he saw people with opposing faiths and views living and working together with a shared mutual respect. His wish is that the hatred and violence between people would dissipate so that everyone can live in harmony and Israel may thrive.

This is why Goulder committed to a $200,000 gift annuity with Jewish National Fund. He hopes to see his gift to JNF used to encourage the same kind of cooperation he saw on his trip to Israel so many years ago, so that the Jewish homeland may exist for future generations. Goulder expresses the hope that his gift annuity can ensure that "When I am gone, let Israel live on."


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